News

Talking to Children About STEM Fields Boosts Test Scores and Career Interest
A new study finds parents who talk with their high schoolers about the relevance of science and math can increase competency and career interest in the fields. The findings, published January 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show a 12 percentage point increase on the math and science ACT for students whose parents were provided with information on how to effectively convey the importance of STEM. The same students also are likely to be more interested in pursuing STEM careers, including taking STEM classes in college and having a favorable impression of the fields.
EB 01/27/17

 

Buffalo Students Unveil Unusual New Science Technology
In one of the most rural elementary schools in the metropolitan Quad-Cities, a quiet revolution is beginning in the science curriculum. Buffalo Elementary School formally introduced virtual reality, or VR technology, that will become part of the school’s and district’s science curriculum. The innovations, Davenport Community Schools Superintendent Art Tate said, are a critical part of the future. Buffalo Elementary is said to be the first in the country to incorporate VR into the Next Generation Standards Science Curriculum.
EB 01/27/17

 

Partnerships with Libraries: Share Your Thoughts and Win
The Afterschool Alliance, along with the STAR Library Education Network and the American Library Association, wants to know if and how afterschool providers are working with public libraries. Take the survey and be eligible to win the grand prize WRiTE BRAiN BOOKS’ 20-week afterschool creative writing and literacy curriculum a $1,200 value.
EB 01/27/17

 

What’s Hot: 9 Major Ed Tech Trends for 2017
Figuring out just what will captivate educators from one year to the next is a fickle business. The use of gaming, flipped learning, banning cell phones and purchasing tablets appear to be waning, while some new movements are definitely waxing. According to 16 education experts THE Journal conferred with, you will be hearing a lot more about nine instructional areas in particular: active learning, augmented reality, maker spaces, Next Generation Science Standards, open educational resources, robotics and STEAM, coding and student privacy. Those last two are red hot. Among the nine, only two of those topics surfaced in last year’s list too: coding and OER.
EB 01/20/17

 

LeVar Burton: Digital Devices Can Embrace Storytelling
LeVar Burton hosted the long-running and much-loved PBS children’s show Reading Rainbow. When the show was cancelled Burton took this opportunity to create a relationship between children, literature and digital devices. The Reading Rainbow Skybrary (Reading Rainbow app) was developed and released in the summer of 2012 and is available across a multitude of platforms. A product specifically for schools that teachers can use in the classrooms with emerging readers was also developed.
EB 01/20/17

 

Connected Science Learning: Call for Contributions
Deadline: March 31, 2017
The theme for the fourth issue of Connected Science Learning (to be published in fall 2017) is going to be STEM for Early Learners.
EB 01/20/17

 

Can Children Learn from a “Mixed-Reality” Game?
Students at a Pennsylvania elementary school tested a “mixed-reality” learning tool that includes building blocks, computer-generated feedback and collaborative tasks. The test is part of a partnership with Carnegie Mellon to study the role of technology in teaching and learning.
EB 01/13/17

 

Worried About Screen Time? Don’t Let Kids Go It Alone
There are more than 80,000 educational apps in Apple’s app store. It seems like a great way to encourage brain development. But just sticking a tablet in kids hands might not be as helpful. Two and three-year-olds who saw a ghost demonstration of how to use an app had a hard time replicating the task but did well after a person sitting next to them showed them how to use the app. Researchers concluded that having a human guide — often referred to as having social scaffolding — helped these young children learn.
EB 01/13/17